Dry Brush Painting Technique & Rustic Inspired Cutting Boards..

I have been playing around with the dry brush painting technique on some smaller objects before I implement them on any of my furniture pieces. I had some old, beat up cutting boards I bought for a dollar a few months ago that were perfect for practicing.

I love dry brushed pieces of furniture, because they make any piece look old and rustic. You don’t have to pay as much attention to dings and scratches while prepping if you are planning on dry brushing, because these imperfections will only add more character to the piece.

This is how my project turned out:

vintagecuttingboard

 

In order to dry brush you only want to dip the very end of your brush in paint. Below is actually a little too much:

Afterward, you need to dab off some of the excess paint until it is essentially dry (hence, dry brushing haha). I just used a paper towel:

Then I lightly painted the surface in short back-and-forth strokes until the entire cutting board was covered.

I decided to add something extra to make them stand out a little more. I found some numbered stencils and used a brownish grey paint I had leftover from another project. (When stenciling, I almost always use a sponge brush. I didn’t have one on hand for this project, but made sure to lightly coat the brush and dab the paint on).

 

I took a small piece of 80 grit sandpaper to distress the numbers on each cutting board. You can see all the old knife marks and scratches on the cutting board in the picture below. I wanted to accentuate these blemishes, and dry brushing is a perfect way to do so.

What I love about dry brushing is that it is nearly impossible to screw up. It’s not suppose to be perfect. If you find any section you don’t like on a piece you’re working on, simply sand it to blend it in better.

 

Do any of you use the dry brush painting technique? What kind of method do you use?

 

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